The Best Dramas of 2012: 7 – The Walking Dead

The ten best dramas of 2012 will be revealed on Hulu’s homepage each weekday of this week. To view the rest of the list, click here.

7 – The Walking Dead

Is there any show more shocking than The Walking Dead? With the amount of characters that have ended up dead this year, we consider ourselves lucky that we survived. We know that shows about dystopian futures where the undead walk the earth aren’t supposed to be laugh riots, but this year who knew how much the show would make us hate the living?

Over Seasons 2 and 3 this year, we saw the group who had worked so hard to remain civilized in their hopes that the zombie plague soon shall pass just lose it, and revert to their basest instincts…and we loved it. Outsiders were not to be trusted, but neither were people you thought you knew. We knew that Merle had unresolved issues in which the group played a hand (We couldn’t help it. We’re sorry), but who expected the down spiral and ultimate demise of Shane? For a moment we thought that civilization could thrive again when we saw the idyllic community of Woodbury, but the Governor has issues, not to mention aquariums filled with zombie heads and his zombie daughter locked up in a closet, and we doubt Andrea can change him. Sorry, Andrea.

And who could have seen the deaths of two of the most vital characters: Dale, the show’s moral compass, and Lori, the show’s chief loser of Carl? When Rick passed out after learning of his wife’s death, it became clear that no one was truly safe anymore, all bets are off and what hope does any one of the survivors truly have?

And then there were the walkers! First of all, how cute is it that every new group we encounter has a different name for the zombies? We look forward to a time when we meet a group who calls the zombies “The Fergusons” as a dark inside joke they refuse to share with Rick because he won’t let them stay in the prison. Secondly, we remember way back in the beginning of Season 2 how our friends complained about the lack of zombie attacks, but the undead are now back in full squirming effect. We seriously have not been able to sit still while we fruitlessly attempt to warn the characters about the zombie about to attack them to the point that our cat is concerned.

Well, that’s one of the reasons our cat is concerned, but that’s for another time.

The more we watch The Walking Dead, the more we can’t help comparing it to Lost. Hear us out. Both shows have groups of strangers thrust together in a world that no longer makes sense to them, in which survival becomes paramount. But while we spent six seasons of Lost learning more and more about the island, with each new season of The Walking Dead, we learn more and more about humanity and the depths to which it will descend in the undead face of the Armageddon, which, we’re learning, is more satisfying…not to mention more helpful should the zombie apocalypse happen. We’re just kidding…when the zombie apocalypse happens.

Martin Moakler


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